The Egyptian Pyramids

Many people, including myself, find the Egyptian Pyramids fascinating.  So I thought I would provide some info on what I learned after putting them on my bucket list.  I hope you find this mini-history lesson helpful and, like me, want to visit them someday.

You probably already know that most of the Pyramids were built as tombs for the country's pharaohs, and other select individuals, many centuries ago.  But if you are anything like me that is all you can remember from what you learned in school.


(Courtesy of Huffington Post)

The earliest known Egyptian Pyramids are found at Saqqara, which is northwest of Memphis.  Some of these were designed by the architect Imhotep; and they are considered to be some of the world's oldest monumental structures.

The most famous Pyramids, however, are those found at Giza, on the edge of Cairo.  Many of the Giza Pyramids are among the largest structures ever built. And the Pyramid of Khufu is the largest Egyptian Pyramid.

Later Pyramids were smaller, hastily constructed, and therefore not built as well--this was a result of many changes.  Consequently, many have not been preserved well, or are buried by desert sands.

All of the Egyptian Pyramids were built on the west bank of the Nile.  As this is where the sun set, Egyptian mythology associated the west bank with the realm of the dead.

The Pyramids have always held our attention, even in more recent times.  In the 12th century, Al-Aziz Uthman tried to destroy the Giza complex.  He did succeed in damaging the Pyramid of Menkaure, but gave up after that because it proved to be too much work.  And the fascination continued into the 20th and 21st century.  Researchers have set out on digs throughout the years; in fact, the latest Pyramid to be discovered was found in November 2008.

I hope you have enjoyed this mini history lesson on the Egyptian Pyramids and that you go visit them.  I know I hope to soon.

Marianne

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